Dutch Heritage in Guyana

Fort Zeelandia, Guyana (©photocoen)History, despite its wrenching pain, cannot be unlived, but if faced with courage, need not be lived again. ~ Maya Angelou

One of our surprises in Guyana has been its earliest colonial history, which happens to be Dutch. Why did we never learn anything about Guyana in school? The Dutch were the first Europeans to establish settlements, forts and plantations in this region and stayed for two centuries before the colonies became British. You’d gather that does deserve some attention, wouldn’t you? Continue reading

5 Awe-Inspiring Landscapes in South America – Our Roles to Help Save the Planet

Tres Cruces, Peru

Tres Cruces, Peru

“An image of the earth, its landscapes, directly affects people. The beauty of the earth creates enormous emotion, and through that emotion, you can transmit knowledge and raise consciousness”~Yann Arthus-Bertrand

This quote spoke to me, which made me read up on Yann Arthus-Bertrand’s work and philosophy. He is known for, among other things, his book Earth from Above – aerial photos from landscapes around the world (more about that here). Yann Arthus-Bertrand is a photo-journalist , cinematographer as well as Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations. Continue reading

The Rewards of Rough Camping

I lean backward, balancing my body on my tailbone, holding my hands under my 45-degree-bent knees. With my feet just reaching the surface I can perfectly balance myself in the river, sitting on the laterite road. According to our GPS the river should run 1.8 kilometers from here! However, it is rainy season and the river has flooded vast stretches of the countryside, including the road. Continue reading

The Sky is the Limit?

Have you ever heard of the Rupununi Savanna in Guyana? It’s a place where you can just sit and watch the world go by. For hours; for days; for weeks. Colors are forever changing.

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All photos by Coen Wubbels. Follow him on Instagram here and here.

Indian Food – Eating From a Lotus Leaf

We have been staying with a family in a gold-mining town. Uma, our host, lives with her parents and her young son Nigel on the outskirts of town. She suggested we should visit one of her aunties and family for a celebration. It takes a bit of patience but we are rewarded with how it feels to eat with our fingers again. (For some reason we have no photos of this particular day, but these will give you an impression of Guyana’s countryside). Continue reading

The Remains of What Once Was the Largest Sawmill in the Caribbean

We had been driving all day through the rainforest and couldn’t find a place to camp because there weren’t any clearings. Until we came upon a fork and, in the distance, saw an antenna, which indicated habitation. We drove there and arrived at Anarika, which turned out to be a logging concession. We asked for permission to stay, which was granted, and were shown around by the passionate guard Owen. Continue reading

5 Places to Connect with Wildlife in South America

Wildlife in South America: Birds of Prey in Parque dos Falcões in Brazil (©photocoen)One of South America’s great features is its wildlife. Not only can you see animals often and at many different locations, at some places you can touch them, caress them, connect with them. Here are some of my favorite places to connect with wildlife in South America: Continue reading