Enjoy Tom Otterness’ Sculptures in Scheveningen (Netherlands)

I remember Scheveningen’s coastline as a stark and uninviting, right-angled boulevard with a busy road running alongside. No longer so. A three-year comprehensive renovation project in this seaside resort has resulted in an elegant, curved boulevard with separate lanes on different levels for walking, cycling and motorized vehicles (one-way). Some 195 stylish streetlights running on LEDs contribute to safety at night. The architect of this major project is the Spaniard Manuel de Solà-Morales. Continue reading

Slow Travel Cities

Slow travel is growing! The term is getting familiar to more travelers and I have come across a number of encouraging initiatives. Among them are a couple of people who have started Slow Travel City Websites. The ones I learned about are Barcelona, Berlin, Brussels and Stockholm. If you know of more, let me know in the comment section below, and I’ll add them to the list. Continue reading

Slow Travel in France

Chatillôn-sur-Seine, France (©Karin-Marijke Vis)

Hard to believe that this tranquil stream in fact is the Seine. With 14th-century Pont (bridge) du Perthuis-au-Loup that has a historic monument since 1928.

“Next time we come here we should stop and walk around for a bit,” I remarked as we traversed Chatillôn sur Seine.

“Why don’t we do it now? Mélanie suggested.

Indeed, why not? Continue reading

Water Management in the Netherlands – Het Kristalbad

Kristalbad, the Netherlands (©photocoen)

“The Miracle is not to walk on water. The miracle is to walk on the green earth, dwelling deeply in the present moment and feeling truly alive.” ~Thích Nhât Hanh

A couple of years ago, when visiting my parents, my father asked me to join him for a bicycle ride. The region I grew up in, in the east of the Netherlands, is characterized by lots of green and even today still has a sense of space. The latter is not evident: the Netherlands is one of the most densely populated countries in the world with an average of 500 inhabitants per square kilometer (for comparison: the U.S. has 35). Continue reading